MalagaThe spotlight is expected to shine on Malaga for some years to come since Malaga City Council decided in 2004 to present a bid to the European Union requesting it be given the title of European Culture Capital in the year 2016. This bodes very well for work and improvements to continue over the next decade to achieve this goal.

 

As well as homage to the great Picasso, other great historic monuments include the imposing Baroque Cathedral, popularly known as ‘La Manquita’ (One Armed Woman), referring to its rather lopsided appearance due to the missing east bell tower. High on the hill above the city is the Parador (state run hotel) of great historic importance. It was once a Moorish castle and is a wonderful place to either stay the night or have a long lunch enjoying these privileged surroundings with panoramic views over Malaga city and out across the port to sea.

Although there was much destruction in Malaga, especially during the time of the Spanish Civil War, there is still plenty of proof of the Moorish occupation. Today you can visit the Moorish Alcazaba fortress, dating back to 1065, which also now features a very interesting archaeological museum. There are also many churches in and around the centre, of great architectural and historic interest well worth visiting.

Malaga centre is not only the perfect place to explore the many historical monuments, atmospheric little streets and squares with delightful café culture, but it is also a wonderful shopping centre. The main street to head for runs perpendicular to the stunning tree lined avenue, the Alameda, and starts at the Plaza Marina, near the port. Calle Marqués de Larios (often simply referred to as ‘Larios’) was made pedestrian in 2002 as part of the overall improvements being made to Malaga centre.